Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

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[FnG] Hanno
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Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Hanno » Sat Aug 15, 2009 4:25 pm

Every so often I go though I stage of considering what I would spend the money on if I won some on the lottery.
(Okay I know the chance is 1 in 14000000 of winning the jack pot, 1 in 200000 of winning £100000, 1 in 55000 of winning £2000 , 1 in 1000 if winning £60
and 1 in 56 of winning £10 > return on a £1 ticket is predicted at 82p not really a good investment)

Back to the money and spending.
If I won £10000 I would buy:
New bed linen and towels £150
A new bathroom sink (as its got a crack in it) £70
Clothes (£100 for me £400 for wife and kid) £500
A wii for daughter £200
Books £180
Days out/meals out £500
A laptop for wife £400
A decent holiday £3000

The remaining £5000 I would put in savings to spend in a years time....

Now the interesting thing is that the top 3 items are slowing getting closer to being a neccesity rather than a luxury - I will have to spend this in the next year or so anyway.
The next 3 items I could afford out of savings now without depleting our reserves too much.
But I would feel too guilty spending savings on semi-luxuries to do this.
Only the final 2 items are beyond my means at the moment- well I could afford them but the damage to savings would be totally unacceptable.

To put my money into overall context, I have have a 30% pay cut in the last few months. Spending money available after bills/food etc left is about £100 a month but I still try and put some money of that into our savings and into Erins university fund, oh and that £100 got to cover petrrol and clothes and other extras . In june I only spent £12 on myself that was not a neccesity (3 books), in July I spent £7 (2 books). Although I admit in AUgust I have spent the last couple of months money that built up on days out/petrol and a takeaway - its the summer holidays!
I am totally adverse to spending money that I don't have to - just in case I need it in the future (the current economic situation makes this worse) BUT have I gone too far should I be spending more money on making life more fun? Actually I believe a nice walk in the countryside or on the beach to be top of my list of days out, take a picnic and its amazing cheap ;-) Fortunately my wife feels about the same about this area. But I really do wonder if we ought to say sodit and spend more now while we are fit and young to enjoy it rather than saving for a mythical retirement?

Anyway back to winning stuff.
If I won £50000 - I would spend just the same as for £10000
but maybe a bit more on clothes/days out and books.
Probably put £40000 against the morgage and keep the other £4000 to spend the following year.

If I won £100000 - spend just the same as above but pay off morgage in full.
Maybe increase the holiday to £5000, and treat nephews and neices/family (£5000)

If I won £250000
Buy a new house with the £250000 but then spend what we
have left over on this house sale on the £100000 stuff plus £5000 on new furniture

If I won £1000000. I would design and build a house £600000
All the other stuff above and have a grand holiday £20000 and retire.

The other interesting thing is that even if I won a million pounds
I would be unlikely to buy a new car, computer or even mobile phone until
the old ones break or become untennable in terms of speed/repair cost.
Not that my current car is fancy like rampantbunnies stag mobile, or my computer rig
is as fast as LcNessies Gigaflop nitrogen cooled stomping PC.
I wouldnt replace my saucepans or crockery or cutlrey on the same basis.
I cannot bear the thought of getting rid of things that work still.

Actually onsecond thought I might buy a van instead of the car and paint black with a red ATEAM stripe. But this would be practical
to put bikes and stuff in the back > I cant life bikes on thee roof of car because of my back!



So the end question, if you won some money what would you spend it on?
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] pyxie.T32 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:37 pm

As a rough breakdown regardless of ammount I would give a third to my Mom, put a third in to savings and a tird in my normal account to spend myself, at the moment. probably on new boots as mine are 3 years old now.
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] LcNessie » Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:46 pm

If it were a "small" amount, say a thousand or so euros, I think I would put it in savings, try and see if I could save up to replacing my aging LPG-sucking battleship, that others tend to call Volvo 740. Even though I love that car, it's just not economical.

If the amount were large enough, say, 10 or 20k Euros, I think I would re-mortgage my house, to negotiate lower monthly payments for a shorter period. OOOh, ooh, wait! I would have my garden completely ripped out and redone...

In the range of 100k, I think I would do the same, but that would mean I would have the house free from mortgage. That would be nice... :chin: :)

Anything above that, would go to the car again, up to the amount of 20.000 euros, which would buy me a pretty modern Volvo 850 or early V70 with all the bells and whistles.

If I were to win a cool million, there would at least be a new car for about 80000 euros. A brand new V70 or something. I would buy a different house in a "vinex" location, probably. I think I would move to Groningen city. Later, I would buy my parents house, if they decide to sell all and start touring Australia in a 300000 dollar winnabago or something :P

Multi million dollar prizes? All of the above and let the money earn itself. Retire, do what I want, don't what I don't want... Oh, and a couple of treats for my closest friends, and those around me that could really use or need it... Up to a point, of course...
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Neecap » Sun Aug 16, 2009 11:48 pm

I would invest a great deal of the prize money in Real Estate seeing as how thats usually a pretty safe bet, atleast here in Norway. Then i would put another good chunk into a savings account for my little brother. I dunno what i would do with the rest of the money, but i would definately treat myself with some luxury travels around the globe. :woot:


Comedy option:
Rent a small army of mercs and seize a secluded country or island somewere, and instate myself as a king and lord protector, complete with sceptre, crown and throne.
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FDG]Sundae » Mon Aug 31, 2009 3:07 pm

As the United States has very little in the way of social safety nets (in that if something goes wrong, there is NOTHING to save you from becoming homeless, broke, and dying of an easily treated disease because you can't afford medical treatment), my answer is likely a bit different for what I would do. For comparison's sake - I'm a healthy male, 26 yrs of age, and while I am employed my insurance costs me only $140 a month because of employer subsidy. When I am without that subsidy, my monthly insurance cost would jump to $2,950. If you have any pre-existing condition in the USA, you had better hope you're never unemployed or are already very rich. My ex-girlfriend's parents were shelling out $9,300 per month for her insurance until she got a job- she was a type I diabetic. Think about that - over $100,000 US per year just to have the privilege to see a doctor.

The smaller the amount, the more of it would get saved and the less spent. I do not have a Euro or Pound key on my keyboard here, so pardon my use of & instead of pound.

If I won &1.000, it would not be a sufficient amount to pay off my student loan debt. Instead, it would go into a savings account as a buffer against unexpected expenses.

If I won &10.000, it would not be a sufficient amount to pay off my student loan debt. Instead, it would go into a savings account for in case I get unexpectedly sick. In the United States, your insurance is only good at "participating providers", which means that if your insurance company doesn't have a contract with a particular provider or hospital, they will not cover your expenses. In most states, this also applies even if you are unconscious, incapacitated, or in some way unable to choose where you are treated. Got hit by a car, end up air-lifted to the nearest hospital? Better hope they take your insurance, because you've got a $200,000+ bill waiting for you when you get out and your insurance isn't obligated to cover you.

If I won &50.000, this is finally the point where I would spend some. &25.000 would go onto my student loans. This would not be enough to pay off my education debt (currently $51,800 remaining), but it'd at least make a dent in it. The remaining &25.000 would be saved.

&100.000 - the entirety of my loans paid off, &25.000 into savings for emergencies, and then the other &25.000 put into an account for my brother's student loans when he graduates.

&500.000 - my loans paid off, &100.000 into savings for emergencies, &100.000 into an account for brother, &100.000 to my mother so she can get a place to live and move out of her parents' place (she works in an area where the average house costs over $750,000 USD, and the average monthly rent is $2,500). That remaining &150.000 or so is a tough one to decide on - it'll probably go into investments since there's no point putting it into savings. It would exceed the maximum amount that FDIC will protect for your savings - if the bank goes out of business, the FDIC will only cover $200,000 USD of your holdings with them. Anything beyond that is unsecured.


No house purchases would be made until beyond the &1.000.000 mark, because I live in an area with high housing prices on poor quality houses and a very limited number of employers (meaning the housing market is more prone to collapse when an employer goes under and takes a large percentage of the workforce with it.)

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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Hanno » Mon Aug 31, 2009 3:43 pm

Wow Sundae those figures about insurance are truely frightening.
In the UK with the good old NHS we pay about 7.5% of income for NHI which covers healthcare/old age pension
but only after the first £400 of gross salary and our employee puts in a similar amount each month.
We dont pay anything while out of work and it doesnt matter what problems you have.
For an average person earning £18000 a year this would be £110 from his pocket and £130 from the employer.
Current exchange rate:
1 U.S. dollar = 0.616256856 UK Pounds


I always thought apart from the major cities that house prices were lower in the US.
Here the smallest house you can buy would be about £100000 this would be like a 1-2 bedroom terrace (row) house in a not so good area
For an average 3 bedroom detached house in a nice area around here you are probabably looing at £300000 . This area is at the lower end of the prices of the UK. Also to remember is our house size (in terms of floor space) is about 50% of the US size with equivelent postage stamp sized gardens. Rent for a small house here would be about £600 for a larger 3 bedroom detached house about £1200
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] 7uh » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:08 pm

[FDG]Sundae wrote:As the United States has very little in the way of social safety nets (in that if something goes wrong, there is NOTHING to save you from becoming homeless, broke, and dying of an easily treated disease because you can't afford medical treatment)

Yes - the number-one cause of bankruptcy in the USA is long-term health-care expense.

[FDG]Sundae wrote:For comparison's sake - I'm a healthy male, 26 yrs of age, and while I am employed my insurance costs me only $140 a month because of employer subsidy. When I am without that subsidy, my monthly insurance cost would jump to $2,950.

While I agree with the sentiment, you can certainly get health care for much cheaper than that. Since my wife and I own our own business, we buy our own health insurance, which costs less than $1,000 a month for me and my wife. We're 20 years older than you and my wife is a 15-year cancer survivor, so our health history is not exactly clean. Do you have no co-pays, or something like that that's driving up the cost?

[FDG]Sundae wrote:If you have any pre-existing condition in the USA, you had better hope you're never unemployed or are already very rich.

For a while, there was a question whether my wife could have been able to get insurance at all given her preexisting condition. As long as you keep up insurance the whole time, though, you can keep getting insurance. The minute there's a lapse in your coverage, insurance companies get crazy that there's nobody else they can allege is responsible for covering whatever horrible disease you show up with.

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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FDG]Sundae » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:13 pm

Yes - the number-one cause of bankruptcy in the USA is long-term health-care expense.


63% of all bankruptcies in 2008 were due to medical expenses. Of those 63%, over 70% of them were people who even had health insurance. (Just throwing some numbers in there to show just how screwed up the situation is.)


While I agree with the sentiment, you can certainly get health care for much cheaper than that. Since my wife and I own our own business, we buy our own health insurance, which costs less than $1,000 a month for me and my wife. We're 20 years older than you and my wife is a 15-year cancer survivor, so our health history is not exactly clean. Do you have no co-pays, or something like that that's driving up the cost?


Nope, my co-pays and OOP max were going to be very high. (Corrected that sentence - they aren't now because I'm on the employer insurance now. They're not great, but they're not terrible.) One of the issues we might be seeing in comparison is that it is illegal for an insurance company to offer the same plan across multiple states. I have no idea why, other than that it was probably lobbied for to create 50 little micro-monopolies. Of the companies willing to cover me in Connecticut, $2,390 is the lowest I found that gave the coverage I needed except for one other plan at $1190 per month, but it had a $10,000 deductible, no OOP max, and would cover a set rate of 50% on your costs. 50% of far too much is still far too much.

Edit - nvm, you're in the same state, so that's not the cause. I don't know what to tell you then. When I moved here prior to being employed, I was unable to find any insurance except for that really terrible plan at under $2,390 per month for me alone. No family included.

For a while, there was a question whether my wife could have been able to get insurance at all given her preexisting condition. As long as you keep up insurance the whole time, though, you can keep getting insurance. The minute there's a lapse in your coverage, insurance companies get crazy that there's nobody else they can allege is responsible for covering whatever horrible disease you show up with.


It is worth mentioning that this isn't necessarily true. This is a state-level law. In some states, your insurance company is allowed to drop you when it comes time for your period-renewal if there's been any change in your health status. In most states, they can get around this by simply raising your rates at period-renewal to something you can't afford in order to make you voluntarily drop off their plan.


Hanno questions about housing


I think for the most part that the housing prices here are cheaper. We just live in stupid areas.

My mother lives with her parents, who are older and need some assistance with things now. They bought a house in a very ritzy town on Long Island back like 50 years ago when things were more affordable. Since then, that area grew into a major bedroom community for NYC lawyers and financial people. The town is unaffordable to move into now, but since my grandparents already own their home, they're set. They also aren't inclined to move. Meanwhile, she works at a hospital in another town on Long Island that has far too many wealthy citizens as well. Again, same issue. Couldn't afford to live there.

The area as a whole is getting very expensive, but there *are* cheaper places she could live. She could probably get her rent down to $1500 to $2000 a month if she was willing to have a 40+ minute commute each way. Since she needs to be near her parents right now, she can't do that.

In my case, I live in a piece of crap town called Groton, in Connecticut. Terrible place. Such a worthless little excuse for a town. Anyway, the area has only three major employers. #1 - Navy Submarine Base. #2 - General Dynamics/Electric Boat, #3 - Pfizer. Everyone else here either commutes to Mohegan Sun Casino for work or works in service positions that only exist because of the three main employers. 81% of the population of Groton rents, because they do not make enough money to afford to buy property here. (Average 2BR/1bath house in Groton goes for $307,000 USD.) The others that do make enough work at those three main employers. If any one of those employers has a set of major layoffs, there is nobody else to buy your house that can afford it and would want to live here.

There are plenty of cheaper places to live in the US. Most of them just aren't in the northeast. ;) I remember you could buy houses in Kansas for $40K, but who the hell wants to live in Kansas? (I lived there for 7 years. I have never been happier to leave a place.)

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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] 7uh » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:52 pm

[FDG]Sundae wrote:
Edit - nvm, you're in the same state, so that's not the cause. I don't know what to tell you then. When I moved here prior to being employed, I was unable to find any insurance except for that really terrible plan at under $2,390 per month for me alone. No family included.

Wow, that's a lot. I know your insurance goes down as you get older (until it starts going back up again when you're my age, heh), but I'm amazed health insurance for a 26-year-old would be that high. :(

[FDG]Sundae wrote:
For a while, there was a question whether my wife could have been able to get insurance at all given her preexisting condition. As long as you keep up insurance the whole time, though, you can keep getting insurance. The minute there's a lapse in your coverage, insurance companies get crazy that there's nobody else they can allege is responsible for covering whatever horrible disease you show up with.

It is worth mentioning that this isn't necessarily true. This is a state-level law. In some states, your insurance company is allowed to drop you when it comes time for your period-renewal if there's been any change in your health status. In most states, they can get around this by simply raising your rates at period-renewal to something you can't afford in order to make you voluntarily drop off their plan.

Yes, exactly -- which is why many people think health insurance shouldn't be a for-profit venture. In the interest of cutting losses, it often penalizes people for things they have no control over (like breast cancer).

You're right, I overstated the link between having insurance and being able to get insurance -- although it does seem to make insurers really crazy if you don't have insurance at all, then try to get health insurance. Like if they don't know your past claims history, you're a much greater risk.


[FDG]Sundae wrote:
Hanno questions about housing

I think for the most part that the housing prices here are cheaper. We just live in stupid areas.

As Sundae said, this area is definitely expensive, I guess in part because of its proximity to New York.

I live near New Haven, which is similar in house prices to Groton, but about an hour closer to New York City. As you go down the coast from Rhode Island to New York, you run the gamut from little seaside communities, to very chic suburbs, to some of the nastiest urban areas in the state. The house prices range from $80,000 for a New Haven or Bridgeport fixer-upper to $50 million for a Greenwich waterfront estate.

And that's just on the water. Inland, prices vary widely as well, and if you look outside Connecticut, you can find much cheaper housing (although it's hard to find it much more expensive unless you go to the West Coast or New York City).

[FDG]Sundae wrote:There are plenty of cheaper places to live in the US. Most of them just aren't in the northeast. ;) I remember you could buy houses in Kansas for $40K, but who the hell wants to live in Kansas? (I lived there for 7 years. I have never been happier to leave a place.)

You can definitely get cheap real estate in the midwest, the west, and the Rust Belt. $40K would probably get you a house in South Dakota, Idaho, parts of Michigan or Ohio, possibly Wyoming ... but (very) generally speaking, you'd have to either not mind being in the middle of nowhere, or not mind risking your life to go down to the store.

Still, you can get less expensive housing in many states where there are actual things going on, and in a relatively crime-free environment -- Oklahoma, (south) Texas, Arkansas/Missouri, etc. And there are a few places that are relatively cheap even in the Northeast, like Syracuse.

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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby Gothelittle Rose » Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:19 pm

This is an interesting thread, I hope nobody minds if I kind of revive it. :)

It's true that living in the Northeast, and especially Connecticut, is ridiculously expensive. We've got tons of state programs and all sorts of stuff that they cover, but there's an increasingly large amount of people as a result who end up as what I call "in-betweeners"... unable to afford their own stuff due to high taxes, and unable to qualify for government programs due to 'high' income.

I'm one of them. :)

We get insurance through my husband's workplace. If we didn't, then our kids would be cover-able for a very low cost through Connecticut's HUSKY program. Or the federal SCHIP program or whatever they're calling it now.

However, we don't qualify for fuel assistance. I was able to fill our oil tank for the winter last year only because the prices dropped before the 'stimulus plan' went into effect. We got on better this year, but I'll never take a filled oil tank for granted again. We don't qualify for any food stamp help, but if we did, we'd be allotted about 170% of the grocery money we have now. If the federal Buy A Car program covered us, we could have replaced my 20-year-old wagon practically for free, but it doesn't, so we still have to save up a good $6,000 at least before it dies for good.

We're very happy to give what we can to help those less fortunate than us. We tend to kind of resent being poorer than the people we're helping with our tax money. (Poorer in terms of disposable income and property owned. :) ) Still, I'm grateful to live in the U.S., where even the poor live wealthy lives compared to many other countries. :)

This health insurance thing is a fiasco and a nightmare. HMO's were basically created by the government in order to 'solve the healthcare problem'. They've only added cost and complexity to the system. Now our government is looking at another government-created solution to this new 'healthcare problem' that looks to add more cost and complexity to the system.

Just about a hundred and fifty years ago at most, almost anybody could afford a trip to the doctor and he delivered babies for the poor for a bag of potatoes. Just in my childhood, my mother paid for all our routine visits, and a doctor's office visit cost roughly what the co-pay does now. We were poorer than my family is now, but we could always afford all the care we needed, including hospital visits.

Even nowadays, however, solutions can be found if you search, bargain, and plan. A friend of mine got into a car accident while unemployed and lacking insurance. He was brought right to the hospital with a shattered leg and back injuries and taken right into surgery. During his recovery, they discovered that he has Type II diabetes. They treated the diabetes, taught him how to manage it, and gave him the full recovery process including physical therapy. Then the bill came in.

As soon as they found out he was uninsured and had to pay for it himself, they cut it nearly in half. He made payments according to his income, payments gentle enough that he was able to save for his wedding meanwhile. Perhaps more importantly, the one thing that can't be guaranteed in any system with scarcity... he walks without a limp.

This is a good part of why insurance reform is such an issue in the U.S. right now. The costs might be tough, but the care is excellent, and we're trying to find ways of reducing the cost without losing the care. :)
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Hanno » Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:45 pm

Gothelittle Rose wrote:This is a good part of why insurance reform is such an issue in the U.S. right now. The costs might be tough, but the care is excellent, and we're trying to find ways of reducing the cost without losing the care. :)


Nice post. We seem to pay a little but then everyone pays it so its sort of spread out. But our care maybe more patchy
in a lot of areas we have what they call a postcode lottery, if you are in one hospital area you might get the latest
best treatment, but if you are one street over you might not get it. Also because our NHS is run by goverment paid idiots,
when costs have to be cut they tend to waste a ton of money on reportd and feasibility studies, then get rid of a load
of doctors and nurses and put in another layer of overpaid management to try and make everything more effeicent.
End result - worse care at higher costs.

On the subject of supporting the welfare state and people claiming benefits, sometimes its hard.
You don't mind so much helping people who are in trouble through no fault of there own but when I see that welfare
money being spent on Alcahol/drugs/tobacco it sort of hurts.
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby Gothelittle Rose » Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:13 pm

I have to say, I'm very glad that my doctors aren't selected by location... yet. My ob/gyn is attached to a hospital about 30-35 minutes drive away. My regular doctor and my kids' pediatrician are attached to another hospital which is about 40-45min away in the exact opposite direction. The actual nearest hospital is about 15 minutes away, maybe 10-12 in a panic. I'd go there if I had a dire emergency. But my chosen doctors are better versed in my specific health issues than the closer ones, and the care I got with the birth of my second baby could have quite literally saved her life. (Cord around the neck, and the very able medical staff already knew it and altered the delivery plan accordingly.)

Last year around Thanksgiving time, my son developed an MRSA from a tick bite on his hand. (Methicillin-resistant staph infection.) His hand started to swell. I took him to the pediatric center, where they sent a picture of it to some of their colleagues online. It was atypical, and they weren't sure what it was. Within less than an hour, they had a referral to the closest of the premiere medical centers in the entire country. (UMass Pediatric, in case anyone was wondering.) If the swelling had been advancing faster, they would have sent him by ambulance or, if necessary, by helicopter. But I drove him up myself. By early afternoon he was in a room, and by evening he had a state-of-the-art custom-new antibiotic. It worked.

Yeah, insurance covered about 90-95% of both with a copay. Yeah, the remaining cost kind of wiped out our finances for a full year. But my children are both perfectly healthy, and how can I put a price tag on that? :)

Now here's capitalism at work. Lots of people gave my health insurance company bad grades (including myself) for it's comparatively low coverage. (Usually they'd cover 100% of everything except for copays, which run $10-20 for office visits and $50 for the emergency room. Mine covers 90ish% of everything except for $20-30 copays and $100 for emergency.) As a result, now they're raising their coverage starting next year, and our health care costs are likely to go down, as long as the government monstrosity isn't passed. My husband's company knows that people sometimes switch companies for the health insurance, and the insurance company knows that if my husband's rather large company abandons them, they'll lose a lot of customers. :)

I agree with you definitely on the trouble with the welfare state. I'd do anything I could to help someone in need. Still, it's a bit galling to see those 'in need' driving around in nicer cars with nicer clothing and fancier electronics bought and paid for with your money, while others fall through the cracks and end up homeless on the street. There's got to be a better way.
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Hanno » Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:28 pm

Gothelittle Rose wrote:There's got to be a better way.


Unfortunately some people being people, what ever method , how ever fair it starts out being people will take advantage of it.

Back on the Doctor side, its a case of luck here on the NHS. I do not even know the name of my doctor - I could find out if I wanted but
if I wanted to see that specific doctor I would have to book 7 -10 days in advance. As most of the things I am likely to see doctors about
for me and family at this stage in life are mroe urgent, I phone the surgery where my doctor is and get an appointment same day with
which ever doctor is free (about 10 doctors work in our surgery). This has a downside that you don't really build up a relationship with
a particular doctor and perhaps a lack of trust of them as well.

Saying that when my wife was very ill a couple of years ago she got excellent care, she saw the doctor within an hour of calling
he immediately diagnosed it and she was in hospital an hour later on a drip. If she hadn't been diagnosed that quickly she
could of been blind/paralysed for life or dead. So we got lucky.
Image
Hanno's Law:
Anyone who says they know what's going on are probably lying.
Anyone who believes they know what's going on is dangerous and should be avoided at all cost.

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[FnG] Lazz
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] Lazz » Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:27 am

[FDG]Sundae wrote: I remember you could buy houses in Kansas for $40K, but who the hell wants to live in Kansas? (I lived there for 7 years. I have never been happier to leave a place.)


How come?

(just out of interest)

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[FnG] 7uh
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Re: Money, Materilsm and Fantasy Spending.

Postby [FnG] 7uh » Mon Jan 11, 2010 2:14 am

[FnG] Lazz wrote:
[FDG]Sundae wrote: I remember you could buy houses in Kansas for $40K, but who the hell wants to live in Kansas? (I lived there for 7 years. I have never been happier to leave a place.)

How come?
(just out of interest)

My guess: Incredibly flat, incredibly boring. Plus there's tornadoes.


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